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Swiperoo On The Go
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A Background On The Development
Swiperoo: A game inspired by road signs
 
Having appeared in the App Store’s heralded Top Chart list earlier this year and hosting a 4-star rating on Google Play from more than 7,000 reviews, it’s fair to say that The Macoteers’  Swiperoo has performed quite well and continues to do so.
Released in November 2015, the app provides an original gaming experience that requires quick fingers, concentration and discipline. What you might not be aware of is the fact that Swiperoo’s development has a rather unusual origin...
The Game
The puzzle-like game is not complicated; the player needs to quickly rotate a cube in the opposite direction to that which various arrows are pointing. The more successful rotations without making a mistake or letting the time run out, the more points the player racks up. But the concept isn’t really Swiperoo’s selling point - indeed, the majority of popular modern apps and games don’t necessarily sound nearly as fun as they actually are when you read up on them. 
Rather, it’s the presentation, the intensity and the pressure that make Swiperoo so rewarding; the exhilarating feeling as you approach a top score, where any little mistake could cost you dearly. It’s an exercise in concentration as you must pay attention to the arrows but ignore the instinctive desire to swipe in the same direction that they are pointing. 
The Backstory
It’s always interesting to hear about where ideas come from and comparing what they start as with what they turn into, almost taking on a life of their own in the process. In the case of Swiperoo, the game’s visual appearance was the first thing that came to life, with the creative team developing the idea on the idea from the concept of yellow road signs with arrows that point in a particular direction. 
Essentially, this gave the creatives some idea of the aesthetic they wanted to go for, and it was here that the game was born. Initially, the arrows were intended to indicate which direction the player need to move/rotate/swipe/tap - it seemed something of a logical step to turn the ‘road sign’ itself into something that could be manipulated by the player and thus it was turned into a cube. 
Development 
Once the general idea had formed, the development phase began and spanned one and a half months. Developers and creatives bounced various ideas around during this process, wanting to get the most out of the concept and make the experience of playing as rewarding as possible. 
Games of this type can benefit by providing some unique payoff when players successfully pull something off. Think of the high pitched sound you heard when you steered your character in between the pipes in Flappy Bird, or to use an even older example, that satisfying pop! sound when you successfully jump on the head of an enemy in Super Mario. Many games will also have irritating sounds and visuals when a player makes a mistake. [[{"fid":"78649","view_mode":"default","fields":{"format":"default","field_file_image_alt_text[und][0][value]":"Difficulty","field_file_image_title_text[und][0][value]":"Difficulty","field_file_image_caption_text[und][0][value]":"Difficulty"},"type":"media","attributes":{"alt":"Difficulty","title":"Difficulty","height":"324","width":"358","style":"width: 358px; height: 324px; float: left;","class":"media-element file-default"}}]]Players start to associate these cues (whether they are visual or by sound) with success or failure and it can make games even more addictive and enjoyable. In Swiperoo, the high-pitched Tick! when a player completes a successful swipe is such an example, as is the red flash and cross that appears when the players swipes in the wrong direction. Finding this balance was an important aspect of the game’s development.
Games of this type can benefit by providing some unique payoff when players successfully pull something off. Think of the high pitched sound you heard when you steered your character in between the pipes in Flappy Bird, or to use an even older example, that satisfying pop! sound when you successfully jump on the head of an enemy in Super Mario. Many games will also have irritating sounds and visuals when a player makes a mistake.
Players start to associate these cues (whether they are visual or by sound) with success or failure and it can make games even more addictive and enjoyable. In Swiperoo, the high-pitched Tick! when a player completes a successful swipe is such an example, as is the red flash and cross that appears when the players swipes in the wrong direction. Finding this balance was an important aspect of the game’s development.
 
The role of the arrows was changed after the testing phase, with the decision being made to require of the player to swipe in the opposite direction.
In the previous version, the player would have less time to size things up and swipe in the same direction, but altering this has made for an interesting facet to the game and extend the time given with each swipe. Further, the name doubles as a play on words with ‘swipe’ and ‘arrow’ combining into Swiperoo, while also tapping into a popular, colloquial name ending for various places, things and people here in Australia (‘eroo’ or ‘aroo’). 
Keep an eye out for a spiritual successor to the swiping mayhem that is Swiperoo; while still in the early phases of development, it builds on what was so great about the original. More information to come on this soon. In the meantime, if you haven’t given Swiperoo a go yet, it can be downloaded for free on the App Store and Google Play. 
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